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Curriculum

PLEASE CONTACT US:

Mr. Stephen Barker, Headteacher, St. Pancras Catholic Primary School, Stratford Road, Ipswich. IP1 6EF.

Telephone: 01473 742074. Email: ad.st.pancras.p@talk21.com.

The School Office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. Mrs. Karen Cork and Mrs. Collette Ransom will be pleased to address any enquiries.

 

PLEASE NOTE: Any parent who would like to have information on this website in hard copy is entitled to receive it free of charge. Please make any request to the School Office.

This section is in five parts:

  • Curriculum primacy, design and organisation
  • The EarlyYears Foundation Stage curriculum
  • The curriculum content followed in each National Curriculum academic year for each subject
  • Phonics and reading schemes used at Key Stage 1 (Years 1 and 2)
  • How parents can find out more about the school’s curriculum

Curriculum primacy, design and organisation

 

What are the statutory requirements?

 

The St. Pancras School curriculum comprises all learning and other experiences that the school         plans for its pupils.

 

Every state-funded school must offer a curriculum which is balanced and broadly based and which:

  • promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and
  • prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life

 

The statutory National Curriculum forms a core part of the totality of the St. Pancras curriculum.     It is from this that the school’s Milestones derive.

 

The school is statutorily bound to comply with the new (September 2014) National Curriculum (Years 1 to 6) but, along with English, Mathematics and Science as core subjects, includes Religious Education (which is not a National Curriculum subject) as a central study area in accordance with its faith status. The key foundation subjects are Physical Education, Music, Art and Design, Geography, History, Computing and French. Aspects of Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHEE), Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) and Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Education (SMSC) are embedded into teaching and learning programmes across the curriculum.

 

Programmes of study are organised into key stages: Key Stage 1 is Years 1 and 2; Key Stage 2 is Years 3, 4, 5 and 6.

 

All state schools are also required to make provision for a daily act of collective worship and must teach Religious Education to pupils at both key stages.

 

Maintained schools in England are legally required to follow the statutory National Curriculum which sets out in programmes of study, on the basis of key stages, subject content for those subjects that should be taught to all pupils. All schools must publish their school curriculum by subject and academic year online.

 

All schools should make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), drawing on good practice. Schools are also free to include other subjects or topics of their choice in planning and designing their own programme of education.

 

What does the Bishop require and how should the curriculum reflect the school’s faith status?

 

(See Policy Statement on Religious Education, Relationships, Prayer and Collective Worship)

 

In the faith life of the Catholic school, Religious Education plays a central part. At the heart of Catholic education lies the Christian vision of the human person. This vision is expressed and explored in Religious Education. Therefore Religious Education is never simply one subject among many but the foundation of the entire educational process. The beliefs and values studied in Catholic Religious Education inspire and draw together every aspect of the life of a Catholic school. Pupils have the right to receive an overall education which will enable them, in the light of the faith of the Church, to engage with the deepest questions of life and find reasons for the hope which is within them. Religious Education is, then, the core subject in a Catholic school.

 

Section 48 legislation enables the Catholic school to teach a Catholic Religious Education programme, together with Catholic Sex and Relationships content.

 

“The curriculum as a whole, and every part of it, is religious, since everything ultimately relates to God. All aspects of the curriculum and its delivery must reflect the fact that Christ is the foundation of the educational enterprise in a Catholic school. The religious character of the curriculum is ensured in the respect shown by teachers and students for the truths appropriate to each curriculum area. It is not part of the Catholic vision of education to introduce religious truths into curriculum areas where they do not naturally or appropriately belong. As well as the subjects of the curriculum, students learn from the values and principles which underpin it, from other activities offered by the school and from the quality of relationships which they experience. The overall purpose of the school is ‘to prepare young people for their life as Christians in the community’ and to enable them ‘to serve as witnesses to moral and spiritual values in the wider world.’” 

 

What do we mean by the primacy of learning?

 

Learning comes first. We set out what it is that we want our children to know, understand and be able to do; then we design a curriculum to promote that learning.

 

This might appear to go without saying. However, the logic has not always been manifest in practice, even during the decades since the introduction of the National Curriculum in 1988.​​​​​​​

 

The Milestones – What is the philosophical rationale?

 

The new (September 2014 / 2015) National Curriculum is founded on the principle that teachers should ensure that pupils have a secure understanding of key knowledge, understanding and skills before moving on. It places more emphasis on specific knowledge that should be acquired by the end of each key stage and requires greater depth of learning.

 

The Milestones have evolved from a longstanding mission to acknowledge the incremental, step by step, linear nature of learning. Not that all learning is linear; much of life’s learning is incidental, ad hoc or experiential. But for most children most of the learning required at school is fundamentally causally connected. If you understand A, then B is accessible to you; and, without B, C is a closed door.

 

St. Pancras children, like their peers across the UK and much of the world, are capable of learning more – and more deeply – than they do. Much teaching is ultimately ineffective because it is superficial. Teachers themselves talk of coverage, seeing the process of imparting capability from the supply side, rather than tailoring what they do to the needs of the consumer. The Milestones have been conceived as a holistic approach designed to root all teaching in the conviction that the best learning is the learning that is retained and, effectively, becomes a lasting part of the learner. It is not momentary – in one minute, gone the next. It is thorough, deep and fertile. Fertile because new learning can take root in it.

 

The most immediate feature of the approach is the nature of the milestones themselves. Drawn from the statutory curriculum, key learning steps have been rigorously identified. This has necessitated a long, streamlining process to which a number of St. Pancras teachers have readily contributed. The criteria were – and remain – demanding. For example, a National Curriculum objective only qualifies as a milestone if it is ‘key’ learning – that is, learning upon which other learning is predicated, opening the door to further learning. This has filtered out fluffy objectives which are not ‘key’ in this sense and often absorb disproportionate teaching time. Milestones also have to be unambiguous and testable. Objectives in the National Curriculum that are either too woolly or cannot be reliably assessed have been re-written – if ‘key’ – or rejected. A strong, meaningful and practical ‘key’ curriculum has evolved.

 

This table sets out the number of milestones in each subject by year group expectation:

 

 

 

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

Y6

TOTAL

Art, Design & Technology, French and Religious Education are, for different reasons, not currently included within the Milestones. We expect each of these four subjects to be included in due course.

ENGLISH

1-37

38-79

80-99

100-118

119-149

150-167

167

MATHEMATICS

1-26

27-65

66-112

113-151

152-199

200-241

241

SCIENCE

1-12

13-28

29-47

48-65

66-85

86-96

96

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

1-10

11-22

23-30

31-41

42-49

50-62

62

MUSIC

1-14

14

HISTORY

1-2

3-6

7-8

9-13

14-18

19-22

22

GEOGRAPHY

1-8

9-22

23-30

31-41

42-53

54-62

62

COMPUTING

1-7

8-11

12-16

17-22

23-27

28-31

31

 

695

 

 

It is essential that the Milestones are understood in a pedagogical context as well as in a curriculum context. It was always an integral part of the approach that it should promote new and better ways of teaching. If learning is to shift from superficial coverage to deep mastery, then teaching needs to shift too. The Milestones approach refuses to let gaps develop. Where they appear, the response should be a prompt and effective closing of them. The Milestones approach, equally, declines to allow pupils who learn fast and retain learning to sit and wait for the others. It pushes them on because professional judgements allow for easy retention. Similarly, and particularly for middle attainers, the Milestones approach does not allow learning to seep away so that pupils are never quite at the level receiving teachers expect. Teaching and assessment go hand in hand all the time - so that teaching and learning continue until the teacher can judge – with moderated professional certainty – that it is acquired forever.

 

And here is another key distinguishing feature of the Milestones; at some point in the Milestones approach, assessment matures into a critical judgement. Teachers are expected to say whether a Milestone has been achieved – that is, internalised long term – or whether further teaching is required. It is a high level judgement and, because of its importance in terms of the future teaching based on it, is moderated by senior colleagues to make sure that it is secure. It raises the status of the profession because it commits the teacher to a diagnostic decision upon which a prescription for future teaching will depend. In adopting a demanding professional judgement like this, we are effectively saying that the popular use of terms such as emerging, developing and exceeding are not sufficiently robust. These terms can be ambiguous and do not lend themselves to effective formative teaching. They downplay the professional judgement, they do not commit the teacher and they complicate the process of next steps.

 

If learning is not wholly assimilated, then more teaching is required. Only when learning is fully internalised is a Milestone achieved. Anything less is insufficiently rigorous and would not be conducive to a clear and formative response.

 

We have opted for high status binders for pupils because we want each pupil’s learning journey to be captured in an important volume that is personal and celebratory and can be presented to each child on entry into the school and presented again, with sincere congratulations, on transfer. The binder sets out the milestones in each subject for each year group, commensurate with the expectations of the National Curriculum. It has sticker pages because children love stickers. It has guidance to guarantee that judgements are sound.

 

And the guidance is for parents as well as teachers. Extending the capacity of parents to help their children is another key feature of the Milestones approach. Through class-based open sessions, parent-teacher consultations and regular progress reports, parents will see precisely where their children are. Then, equipped with their own Milestones packs, they will see what their children need to do to achieve the next learning step and will know exactly how to help.

 

With school staff and parents right with them – and even if parents are not – the approach envisages that pupils will take a more proactive role in driving their own learning. The approach requires staff to sit with pupils – individually, perhaps in groups – to understand where the stickers are and where there are gaps and to see how progress measures up against age-related expectations. It requires pupils to focus on the next Milestone- with absolute clarity about how to achieve it. Managed well – and with the enthusiasm that should enrich all learning interactions – pupils will be encouraged to achieve as many stickers as they can, with each sticker valued highly because of the important learning step it represents.

 

And a commitment to staff wellbeing is the final key feature of the Milestones initiative. Teachers and teaching assistants will know that their teaching is effective in a climate of certainty that they have not known before. Research consistently shows that stress in the workplace often derives from ill-defined measures of success – which, on a day to day basis, leaves people insecure about their own performance and vulnerable to anxieties and fear. The Milestones effectively strip out the uncertainties. And, inspired and encouraged by leaders and colleagues, teachers and TAs should be able to go home each evening sure of their work practices and sure of their effectiveness.

 

​​​​​​​The Milestones – What is the technical rationale?

 

The Milestones initiative starts from a statement of what children at primary age should know, understand and be able to do. This is the curriculum. The National Curriculum provides a statutory framework for any school’s curriculum. But – within reason – schools like St. Pancras can tailor it to their own particular local needs and aspirations. Most do not modify it much, largely through fear of stepping too far from the mothership or because they don’t have the professional confidence and expertise to do so. Or, worse, because commercial pupil progress tracker packages, unable to respond to a potential myriad of bespoke local solutions, have geared their systems to the National Curriculum in its entirety and, in a world without reassuring levels, schools have followed suit.

 

A significant number of St. Pancras children enter school with little – or no – measurable literacy or numeracy capability. A significant number of the school’s pupils come from backgrounds characterised by a restricted spoken communication code, low value placed on academic achievement, no previous experience of academic qualification and few books, with consequent low expectations of their performance at school. The school is committed to doing what it can to enable these children to do as well as their peers who do not suffer these constraints. Its staff believe that to adopt the National Curriculum wholesale would not be conducive to giving these St. Pancras children the opportunity to do as well. Therefore, and with every care that the curriculum should remain broad and balanced – an entitlement for every pupil – the Milestones modification of the curriculum puts a premium on basic knowledge, understanding and skill so that those children who need it can catch up.

 

St. Pancras has the experience, expertise and track record – longstanding and recent – to make these modifications with confidence.

 

If the school’s curriculum is to prepare pupils for favourable comparisons with their contemporaries nationally and, at the same time, give a boost to those who are disadvantaged on entry, then it must also provide fast-track opportunities for those who enter school ahead of their peers, who learn fast and who benefit from a wide and varied curriculum. Again, local modifications have been made to strike this balance. Some Milestones extend learning beyond the confines of the National Curriculum. Others enhance the knowledge-base or degree of understanding implied by NC objectives. However, the most telling adjustments have occurred where staff such as Mr. Ross Evans and Miss Lucille Southgate have re-modelled objectives in the interest of unambiguous clarity – or rejected them because they are too abstract to be re-written.

 

Here is an example of a modified National Curriculum objective:

 

En 1 / 1B   Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge   becomes   EN Y1.2   I ask questions

 

And here are two examples of rejected National Curriculum objectives

 

En 1 / 1L   Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication

 

En 1 / 1G   Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas 

 

Key learning, it is argued, is learning that pupils cannot do without. Therefore, it has to take priority, even for relatively advantaged learners. Much key learning is linear, incrementally gaining in complexity, demanding a higher level response and offering a wider and deeper range of application. It offers a logical progression, a clear direction, often lost when it is allowed to be crowded out by a plethora of lesser learning. Equipped with a strong grounding in all the key areas of learning, the argument goes, pupils can more readily and more effectively – more imaginatively, more creatively – apply their knowledge, understanding and skills. For many this will mean that a slightly narrower curriculum to begin with, to achieve a catch up or close gaps, is more than made up for with the wherewithal to explore far wider academic horizons thereafter.

 

It should be noted that the Milestones approach jettisons the populist belief that learning is only worthwhile when it is applied or solves problems. The Milestones acknowledges that, for the great majority of people, learning at primary school is a necessary passport to application and problem-solving. An apprenticeship, if you like. An acquisition of the necessary tools and skills. When educationalists bleat about the real gains to be made by problem-solving and applying and the corresponding losses incurred by relentless paper-based exercises, they raise an important point. Rightly so, sometimes - but way off the mark if they include within their argument’s scope, which they nearly always do, all those unfortunate children who never sufficiently acquired the basics and for whom, therefore, all further learning was inevitably compromised. How can you apply knowledge that was never yours? And, equally, you need secure intellectual tools to solve problems, a simple truth that strangely eludes many of those who would consider themselves to be among the intellectual elite. 

 

Numbering the Milestones is useful because it highlights priority, emphasises learning continuity and facilitates electronic number-crunching for formative, reporting and accountability purposes. The system gives primary place to year group – the prefix Y1, for example. This ties each Milestone to an age-related expectation. Beyond the year group identifier the Milestones in any given subject are numbered continuously. Thus, in English, Y1.37 – the final Year 1 Milestone – is followed by Y2.38 – the first Year 2 Milestone. This promotes ‘moving on’ – accelerated progress into the next year’s learning. The fact that there are more Milestones in some year groups than in others is not significant. It simply reflects the fact that, in some year groups, there are more relatively simple bits of key learning and, in others, more relatively complex bits.

 

However, the discrepancy in the number of Milestones across subjects is both interesting and enlightening, as it suggests that some subjects require very different forms of learning, not just different content. Music, for example, has only 14 Milestones across a six-year curriculum, whereas Physical Education is defined in terms of 62 bits of key learning. Another subject with 62 learning steps is Geography - and yet History has just 22. Close analysis of what is required to achieve Milestones in these different disciplines indicates that some subjects are naturally comprised of lots of smaller items of learning, whilst others are made up of fewer but larger chunks of learning. The Geography / History comparison is a useful one. The Geography Milestones are knowledge-heavy, reflecting the wide spectrum of knowledge about the world and its places demanded by today’s connected and increasingly global society. The History Milestones, in contrast, are understanding-heavy, reflecting cause-consequence and the capacity to be able to articulate the interrelatedness of key aspects of the past in understanding any one event.

 

Where a judgement about achievement of a Milestone is not cut and dried by reference to the wording of the Milestone alone, or needs to be defined in terms of quantity or nature of learning, the Guidance Section provides definitive advice. So, for example, for Science, Y4.63 – Knowing how to make an electrical circuit and naming its parts - the Guidance Section makes it absolutely clear that the pupil needs to know and understand the respective names and roles of cells, wires, bulbs, switches, buzzers and motors. On the other hand, for Science Y2.25 – I know that animals and humans need air, food and water for survival – there is no guidance because the wording is sufficient for a judgement about learning to be made.

 

In summary, therefore, the Milestones are items of key learning, commensurate with age-related expectations, benchmarked nationally and adjusted for local expediency.

 

Measuring progress for individuals will be automatic in that a sticker in the pupil’s Milestones Passport and a corresponding click on the database will continually update the pupil’s attainment profile. The child can consult the Passport. The teacher can consult the Passport or the database. The parent can consult the Passport or the latest progress report. How well a pupil is doing will be gauged by reference to the Milestones for the pupil’s year group which are in line with age-related expectations. At the close of each academic year, there will be a floor expectation that all pupils will have all the stickers for every subject in the year group they are completing - with no gaps in that year and no gaps dating from previous years. There will be a parallel expectation that many pupils will have stickers relating to upcoming Milestones, reflecting the capacity for faster progress and higher or advanced attainment.

 

Most importantly, there will be a working expectation, promoted through highly focused Performance Management, that receiving teachers can rely on the judgements made by sending teachers, even allowing for summer holiday slippage.

 

The database will provide for very quick access to individual pupils’ attainment profiles. Within three clicks teachers will be able to see precisely where each child is in each subject. This data can be retrieved in the form of simple diagrammatic reports – for colleagues, subject leaders and parents / carers.  Year group or cohort data will be equally accessible and retrievable. The database has been designed to provide subject specific attainment and progress data that can be interrogated by gender, educational status (SEN/D) or socio-cultural-economic status (LAC, ASC, FSM, BME & EAL).

 

The performance management (appraisal) of teachers and teaching assistants is supported by the Milestones in ways which reflect the key features of the approach; Thorough teaching and new pedagogies ; high level professional judgements; a commitment to no gaps; high progress expectations; and effective engagement with parents. We expect appraisals to be sharply focused and formative, imparting a very real sense of professional direction and fulfilment for all staff.

 

The gaps issue is central to the approach. Perhaps more than any other shortcoming of the past, the failure of our education system to teach all pupils thoroughly has restricted progress and capped attainment, especially for the disadvantaged. Making it ‘uncomfortably’ clear where the gaps are is a conscious aim of the initiative, reflected in the Milestones Passports, where gaps will stand out like a sore thumb, and in the electronic data entry, analysis and retrieval system. There will be a big visual incentive to close gaps as well as a moral imperative!

 

The Milestones approach has been designed to allow for curriculum change and ever higher expectations of primary age pupils. Both the Milestones Passports and the electronic data entry, analysis and retrieval system will accommodate quick and simple adjustments. The Passports are printed one-sided and pages can be slotted in or out, replaced or supplemented with ease. Government rhetoric promises curriculum stability for at least a few years hence – but experience teaches us to be prepared for inevitable tinkering from time to time. Given the relatively high unit cost of the Passports, it was important that capacity for change should be built in at minimal additional expense.

 

Four statutory curriculum subjects are currently not represented in the Milestones. The most high profile of these for a Catholic school is the core subject, Religious Education. The Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales is currently standing by its Curriculum Directory and associated provisions which continue to use levels of attainment. Given that we should be expected to comply with this curriculum and its organisation in a Section 48 inspection – a possibility at any time – then it is prudent to wait for now. Having said this, draft Milestones for R. E. are ready for consideration. Art and Design Technology are two subjects that, at any level, are subject to wide interpretations in terms of competence and quality. Put bluntly, deciding what is good in Art – or effective for a young child in DT – is highly subjective. We tried to craft some milestones for both subjects but they were contrived and rarely met the criteria. We are actively seeking another way of bringing curriculum, teaching, assessment and progress together in a meaningful and practical way for Art and DT but it won’t be through the Milestones. And, finally, although French is not represented, we do believe that it could be – and probably will be soon.

 

It is implicit in the Milestones approach that its implementation will be monitored constantly. Teachers and leaders will evaluate its impact on pupil progress and attainment, first and foremost. They will also consider the extent to which the practice of teaching is shifting, the features of any new pedagogies, the reliability and security of professional judgements, the motivational effects on pupils and parents and the quality of data and reports. This is where governance must play its part. Governors need to involve themselves in the early implementation wherever they can, certainly by attending staff workshops and debates and raising challenging questions. Governors need to be sure that St. Pancras children are going to be better off with the Milestones than without.

 

And for a school that professes to care – Christ-like – for all its children, the parable of the Lost Sheep is apposite, particularly in relation to the issue of gaps. The shepherd, though doubtless pleased to have his ninety-nine sheep safe in their expected pen, is not satisfied until he has gone out of his way to find the lost one. The gate to the pen is closed only when all the sheep are in.

 

​​​​​​​What are our curriculum aims?

 

To ensure that Religious Education is at the curriculum’s core

 

So that Religious Education is truly at the heart of the curriculum

To prioritise the incremental building blocks of literacy and numeracy competence

So that pupils’ local needs are met in a context in which a majority have restricted academic support at home

To reflect statutory requirements

 

So that the curriculum is wholly compliant

To promote singing and Physical Education and sports across the school

So that pupils with restricted academic support and aspiration at home have the opportunity to realise potential in other fields

To place a particular value on the acquisition of knowledge

So that the curriculum reflects the needs of boys as well as girls and builds confidence in all pupils

To make drama a specialism

So that the curriculum may be enhanced for performance, promoting high standards of oracy, building confidence for all pupils

To ensure that teaching and learning is enhanced at every turn by positive messages which promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and develop pupils' awareness of - and capacity to contribute to - fundamental British values

 

So that pupils are prepared to make a positive contribution to British society

 

​​​​​​​How is our curriculum distinctive, what priorities does it have and how does it reflect local needs and aspirations?

 

Distinctiveness starts with the curriculum aims (set out above) and the emphases they bring. This is a curriculum that has religious faith, theology and philosophy at its heart, knows the importance of a thorough grounding in basic literacy and numeracy, values knowledge – without which a problem-solving curriculum has no reference base – and prioritises drama, music and physical development.

 

The school’s faith status adds to the distinctive mix by placing at the curriculum’s heart Bishops’ Conference R. E.

 

However, distinctiveness is apparent in the detail too. The Milestones – the building blocks of the curriculum – are detailed, specific, unambiguous and incremental. In English, Mathematics, R. E., Science, French and the other subjects key learning is expressed as essential detail to a greater extent than in most other primary curricular.

 

Distinctiveness is evident in content too, especially where the National Curriculum offers options. This is particularly the case in Geography and History.

 

The enriched and extended curriculum adds another dimension to the curriculum’s distinctiveness, whether through the faith-based visits programme or through visits organised to support learning or as rewards.

 

YEAR 1

St. Mary Magdalen Parish Church, Ipswich

YEAR 2

The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Norwich

YEAR 3

The Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham

YEAR 4

The Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham

YEAR 5

The Carmelite Monastery at Quidenham / The Orthodox Community at Tiptree (other faiths)

 

Music, drama and sports are priorities. These are spheres in which pupils in highly advantaged socio-economic circumstances typically have great opportunities. Our aim is to do all that we can to level the playing field, whether through extra-curricular provision or during the school day. So, we sing more – and at a higher standard – than most comparable schools. We participate in a wide range of sports –winning many of them – than most maintained primaries. And we offer drama – ambitious and inclusive – in lessons and in assemblies and for public performance.

 

The intention is for Art to attain the same status as music, drama and sports so that St. Pancras pupils have enhanced opportunities in this creative field too.

 

​​​​​​​How is the curriculum organised on timetables?

 

It is a requirement for Religious Education to have priority timetable allocation, especially at Key Stage 2. For junior pupils there should be a minimum of two full lessons per week, one of which must be timetabled for a morning slot. This underlines R. E. as a core subject.

 

English and Mathematics (inclusive of reading, writing, grammar, punctuation, spelling, handwriting and x tables) are expected to dominate the primary curriculum in all year groups, particularly the morning sessions. This reflects their core importance for St. Pancras pupils. 

 

Two other subjects benefit from priority timetable allocation because they are taught by specialists whose timetables have to be carefully put together. These are French and Physical Education. Pupils at Key Stage 2 have one French lesson per week and all pupils in the school have two P. E. lessons per week.

 

Teachers are given a range of options in respect of allocating timetable space for Science, Music, Geography, History, Art / Design Technology and Information Technology. These include weekly lessons, blocked days (in which subjects are taught intensely for periods and are then absent from the timetable for a while) or half termly / termly allocations (where, for example, Geography may be taught in one term but is replaced by History the following term). There is an expectation that Science, as a core subject, will have more time allocated to it than the foundation subjects.

 

Other aspects of the curriculum are built into the teaching and learning content of core and foundation subjects – or into the school’s highly developed daily assembly programme. These include Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE), Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) and Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Education (SMSC).

 

 

Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum

 

Pupils in Reception (Rainbows) follow the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) curriculum. The new Statutory Framework for Early years children became effective in September 2014. It seeks to provide:

  • Quality and consistency in all settings - so that every child makes good progress and no child gets left behind
  • A secure foundation through learning and development opportunities which are planned around the needs and interests of each individual child and are assessed and reviewed regularly
  • Partnership working between practitioners and parents / carers
  • Equality of opportunity - and anti-discriminatory practice, ensuring that every child is included and supported

 

The Early Years Foundation Stage curriculum specifies learning and development requirements and safeguarding and welfare requirements and is underpinned by four guiding principles:

  • Every child is unique and constantly learning - and every child can be resilient, capable, confident and self-assured
  • Every child can learn to be strong and independent through positive relationships
  • Every child can learn and develop well in enabling environments, in which their experiences accord with their individual needs and there is a strong relationship between practitioners and parents / carers
  • Children develop and learn in different ways and at different rate

 

The learning and development requirements are made up of:

  • Seven areas of learning and the educational programmes
  • The Early Learning Goals, which summarise the knowledge, skills and understanding all young children should have by the end of reception year
  • The assessment arrangements, including how practitioners should report and discuss progress with parents and carers

 

The seven areas of learning are described as prime and specific:

 

The prime areas of learning are:

  • Communication and language
  • Physical development
  • Personal, social and emotional development

 

The specific areas of learning are:

  • Literacy
  • Mathematics
  • Understanding the world
  • Expressive arts and design

 

For information on the detail relating to the educational programmes for the seven areas of learning, please see Miss Ellen Skinner or Miss Becky Aldous in Rainbows.

 

For a statement describing the St. Pancras approach to Early Years provision please click on the link below:

Content followed in each academic year for each subject

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN ENGLISH

 

These are the Milestones for English. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil) and strand.

 

 

Speaking and listening

Y1.1

I listen carefully to others and give answers

Y1.2

I ask questions

Y1.3

I explain what I think

Y1.4

I say what things are like

Y1.5

I speak clearly so that people can hear me easily

Y1.6

I take part in conversations and discussions

 

 

 

Reading

Y1.7

I speedily read all 40+ phonemes

Y1.8

I read some unfamiliar words by blending

Y1.9

I read some common exception words

Y1.10

I read common suffixes

Y1.11

I read multi-syllable words

Y1.12

I retell familiar stories

Y1.13

I correct myself as I read

Y1.14

I say what will happen next

 

 

Transcription / Spelling

Y1.15

I spell some words containing each of the 40+ phonemes

Y1.16

I spell common exception words

Y1.17

I spell the days of the week

Y1.18

I say the alphabet in order

Y1.19

I use spelling rules I have learnt

Y1.20

I listen to, recall and write down sentences

Y1.21

I use suffixes: -ing / -ed / -er / -est

 

Handwriting

Y1.22

When I sit at a table, I hold my pencil correctly

Y1.23

I write lower case letters facing the correct way and starting and finishing in the right place

Y1.24

I write all the capital letters

Y1.25

I write the numbers from 0 to 9

 

 

Composition

Y1.26

I say out loud what I am going to write about

Y1.27

Before I write I can say what my sentence will be

Y1.28

I put sentences together to create a short story

Y1.29

I read what I have written and say if it makes sense

Y1.30

I read aloud what I have written in a clear voice

Y1.31

I join words using ‘and’

 

Grammar and punctuation

Y1.32

I put the right size spaces between words

Y1.33

I join phrases using ‘and’

Y1.34

I use a capital ‘I’ when writing about myself

Y1.35

I add ‘s’ or ‘es’ to a word to show there are more than one

Y1.36

I add suffixes to words where the spelling does not change

Y1.37

I know how to put words together to make a sentence

Speaking and Listening

Y2.38

I give reasons for my answers

Y2.39

I describe what I think and feel

Y2.40

I change the volume and pitch of my voice to show what I mean

 

 

 

Reading

Y2.41

I read accurately and fluently using decoding and blending skills

Y2.42

I read multi-syllable words

Y2.43

I read exception words

Y2.44

I explain the difference between fiction, non-fiction and poetry

Y2.45

I explain the sequence of events in stories

Y2.46

I have read a wide range of books, including fairy stories and traditional tales

Y2.47

I explain the meaning of words

Y2.48

I perform poetry learnt by heart with effective expression

Y2.49

I read my writing aloud with expression

Y2.50

I read contractions and understand the use of the apostrophe

Y2.51

I infer from what is said and done

 

Transcription / Spelling

Y2.52

I spell exception words

Y2.53

I spell words that have letters missing to make them shorter

Y2.54

I use apostrophes to show ownership

Y2.55

I add prefixes

Y2.56

I add suffixes -ment -ness -ful -less -ly

Y2.57

I listen to, recall and write sentences read by the teacher

 

Handwriting

Y2.58

I know how to join letters and which letters are not joined

Y2.59

I write capital letters and numbers the right size

Y2.60

I use spaces between words that match the size of my letters

 

Composition

Y2.61

I write stories about my experiences and those of others

Y2.62

I write about real events

Y2.63

I write poetry

Y2.64

I write for different purposes

Y2.65

I plan before I write by writing key ideas or words

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary and Grammar

Y2.66

I use capital letters and full stops in my writing

Y2.67

I use capital letters for the names of people, places and days of the week

Y2.68

I use question marks correctly

Y2.69

I use exclamation marks correctly

Y2.70

I add description to sentences and phrases

Y2.71

I use the present and past tenses correctly throughout my writing

Y2.72

I write complex sentences

Y2.73

I change adjectives by using –ful and –less

Y2.74

I add –er and –est to adjectives to compare things

Y2.75

I use the suffix –ly to make adverbs

Y2.76

I use commas in a list

Y2.77

I know the difference between an apostrophe for ownership and one for shortened words

Y2.78

I say what all the vowels are

Y2.79

I use a or an correctly by checking if the next word begins with a consonant or a vowel

Speaking and Listening

Y3.80

I say what could happen, using my imagination

 

Reading

Y3.81

I take part in class performances

Y3.82

I listen to others’ views and build on what is said

Y3.83

I have read a wide range of books, including plays and poetry

Y3.84

I infer about feelings, thoughts and motives

 

Transcription / Spelling

Y3.85

I spell and use homophones correctly

Y3.86

I spell words that are often misspelt

Y3.87

I use apostrophes for possession in regular singular

Y3.88

I check the spelling of a word in a dictionary using the first two or three letters

Handwriting

Y3.89

I join my handwriting correctly and neatly

 

Composition

Y3.90

I enrich my writing with special vocabulary

Y3.91

I organise my writing in paragraphs

Y3.92

I write stories with settings, characters and plots

Y3.93

I write non-fiction with headings and sub-headings

Y3.94

I edit and make corrections to my writing

 

Grammar and punctuation

Y3.95

I use prefixes such as super- inter- anti- auto- im- and sub-

Y3.96

I use adverbs to add detail

Y3.97

I use inverted commas to punctuate direct speech

Y3.98

I extend my sentences with a wide range of conjunctions

Y3.99

I use pronouns to make my writing flow without repetition

Speaking and Listening

Y4.100

I take part in class performances with confidence

 

 

Reading

Y4.101

I read exception words, including some with unusual spelling

Y4.102

I use a dictionary to check the meaning of words

Y4.103

I perform plays and poetry aloud, varying the intonation, tone and volume of my speech

Y4.104

I recognise words and phrases which capture the reader’s interest

Y4.105

I recognise some different forms of poetry

Y4.106

I explain the meanings of words in context

Y4.107

I use evidence to justify inferences

Transcription / Spelling

Y4.108

I spell words that are often misspelt

Y4.109

I use irregular plurals correctly

Handwriting

Y4.110

I write in a clear, consistent style with consistent ascenders and descenders

 

Composition

Y4.111

I plan effectively for fiction and non-fiction writing

Y4.112

I make suggestions to improve my writing and the writing of others

Y4.113

I proof-read writing thoroughly for spelling and punctuation errors

 

Grammar and punctuation

Y4.114

I recognise and use Standard English verb inflections

Y4.115

I use extended noun phrases, supported by prepositions

Y4.116

I use and punctuate direct speech correctly, including the use of the comma

Y4.117

I use the possessive apostrophe correctly

Y4.118

I use commas after fronted adverbials

Speaking and Listening

Y5.119

I argue for or against a subject with reasoning

Y5.120

I take part in conversations, discussions and drama activities with confidence

 

 

 

Reading

Y5.121

I have read a range of modern fiction, fiction from literary heritage and fiction from other cultures and traditions

Y5.122

I can recommend books, giving reasons for choices

Y5.123

I make comparisons between books

Y5.124

I know some poems off by heart

Y5.125

I read plays and poems, showing understanding through expression

Y5.126

I predict future events from stated details

Y5.127

I discuss how authors use language, including figurative language

Y5.128

I distinguish between fact and opinion

Y5.129

I show understanding of a text by answering questions in full sentences

Transcription / Spelling

Y5.130

I spell some words with silent letters

Y5.131

I confidently and quickly use a dictionary to check spelling and meaning

Y5.132

I use a thesaurus effectively

Handwriting

Y5.133

I write legibly and fluently in a joined script

 

 

Composition

Y5.134

My writing reflects the purpose of the task

Y5.135

I adopt the features of texts to shape my own writing

Y5.136

I use a variety of sentence structures for impact

Y5.137

I develop atmosphere in my writing

Y5.138

I use advanced organisational and presentational techniques

Y5.139

I use the correct tense consistently throughout a piece of writing

 

 

 

Grammar and punctuation

Y5.140

I ensure subject and verb agreement

Y5.141

I recognise differences between formal and informal language

Y5.142

I use a passive voice to assist the presentation of information

Y5.143

I use the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships between time and clause

Y5.144

I use expanded noun phrases to convey complex information concisely

Y5.145

I use relative clauses

Y5.146

I use colons correctly

Y5.147

I convert nouns and adjectives into verbs using -ate -ise and -ify

Y5.148

I use hyphens to avoid ambiguity

Y5.149

I use brackets and dashes to indicate parenthesis

Speaking and Listening

Y6.150

I can defend my viewpoint when challenged

Y6.151

I take a key part in conversations, discussions and drama activities with confidence

Y6.152

I speak with confidence and presence to engage and hold an audience

Reading

Y6.153

I know some poems off by heart

Y6.154

I predict future events from stated details and what is implied

Transcription / Spelling

Y6.155

I spell some words with silent letters

Handwriting

Y6.156

I write legibly and fluently in an efficient and personal style, using a pen

 

Composition

Y6.157

My writing reflects the task and the audience for whom Iam writing

Y6.158

I use dialogue to develop atmosphere and tension in settings and between characters

Y6.159

I précis longer passages

Y6.160

I use a range of cohesive devices

 

 

Grammar and punctuation

Y6.161

I use modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility

Y6.162

I use commas to clarify meaning and avoid ambiguity

Y6.163

I write formally

Y6.164

I understand synonyms and antonyms

Y6.165

I use grammatical connections and adverbials for cohesion

Y6.166

I use ellipsis

Y6.167

I use semi colons correctly

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN MATHEMATICS

 

These are the Milestones for Mathematics. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil) and strand.

 

 

 

 

Number Place Value and Rounding

Y1.1

I recite to and across 100, forwards and backwards

Y1.2

I count, read and write numbers to 100

Y1.3

I recite multiples of 1

Y1.4

I recite multiples of 2

Y1.5

I recite multiples of 5

Y1.6

I recite multiples of 10

Y1.7

I find one more or one less of a number

Y1.8

I read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in words

 

Addition and Subtraction

Y1.9

I understand the symbols + and =

Y1.10

I know and use number bonds to 20

Y1.11

I know and use subtraction facts within 20

Y1.12

I solve one step problems using addition and subtraction

 

Multiplication and Division

 

Y1.13

I double single digit numbers

Y1.14

I show multiplication using arrays

Y1.15

I complete number patterns

Y1.16

I solve multiplication problems

 

Fractions

Y1.17

I find and name half of a shape

Y1.18

I find and name half of a number

Y1.19

I find and name quarter of a shape

Y1.20

I find and name quarter of a number

 

 

Measures

Y1.21

I measure and record lengths and heights

Y1.22

I measure and record mass / weight

Y1.23

I measure and record capacity / volume

Y1.24

I measure and record time

Y1.25

I know the values of coins and notes

Y1.26

I tell the time to the hour and half past the hour

 

Number Place Value and Rounding

Y2. 27

I count in steps of 3

Y2.28

I count forwards and backwards in tens from any number

Y2.29

I know the place value of each digit in a 2-digit number

Y2.30

I estimate quantities

Y2.31

I order numbers from 0 to 100

Y2.32

I use the less than and greater than signs

Y2.33

I read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and words

 

Addition and Subtraction

Y2.34

I solve one step problems with + and -

Y2.35

I know number facts to 100

Y2.36

I add and subtract 2 digit numbers to 20

Y2.37

I show that addition can be done in any order and subtraction cannot

 

Multiplication and Division

Y2.38

I instantly recall and use x facts for the 2, 5 and 10 x tables

Y2.39

I instantly recall and use division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 x tables

Y2.40

I know odd and even numbers

Y2.41

I know that multiplication and division are the inverse of one another

Y2.42

I know that multiplying two numbers can be done in any order

Y2.43

I solve one step problems using addition and subtraction

 

Fractions

Y2.44

I find, name and write fractions of a length

Y2.45

I find, name and write fractions of a shape

Y2.46

I find, name and write fractions of a set of objects

Y2.47

I find, name and write fractions of a number

Y2.48

I write fractions and recognise some equivalances

 

 

Measures

Y2.49

I use standard units to estimate and measure accurately

Y2.50

I use some equipment to measure accurately

Y2.51

I compare and order length, mass, volume and capacity

Y2.52

I use symbols for pounds and pence

Y2.53

I solve money problems

Y2.54

I compare and sequence intervals of time

Y2.55

I solve problems using measures

Y2.56

I know and use words relating to dates – days, weeks and months

 

Geometry

Y2.57

I know the properties of 2D shapes

Y2.58

I identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes

Y2.59

I know the properties of 3D shapes

Y2.60

I compare and sort 2D and 3D shapes

 

Data

 

Y2.61

I interpret and construct pictograms

Y2.62

I interpret and construct tally charts

Y2.63

I interpret and construct block diagrams

Y2.64

I interpret and construct tables

Y2.65

I ask and answer questions about totalling

 

Number Place Value and Rounding

Y3.66

I count from 0 in multiples of 4 and 8

Y3.67

I count from 0 in multiples of 50 and 100

Y3.68

I find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number

Y3.69

I know the place value of each digit in a 3-digit number

Y3.70

I compare and order numbers to 1000

Y3.71

I read and write numbers to 1000 in numerals and words

Y3.72

I solve number problems

 

 

Addition and Subtraction

Y3.73

I add and subtract numbers mentally – 3-digit numbers and 1s

Y3.74

I add and subtract numbers mentally – 3-digit numbers and 10s

Y3.75

I add and subtract numbers mentally – 3-digit numbers and 100s

Y3.76

I add numbers with up to 3 digits

Y3.77

I subtract numbers with up to 3 digits

Y3.78

I estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check

Y3.79

I solve addition and subtraction word problems

Y3.80

I solve missing number problems for addition and subtraction

 

Multiplication and Division

Y3.81

I instantly recall and use 3 times table multiplication and division facts

Y3.82

I instantly recall and use 4 times table multiplication and division facts

Y3.83

I instantly recall and use 8 times table multiplication and division facts

Y3.84

I use mental strategies to multiply a 2-digit number by a 1-digit number

Y3.85

I use efficient written methods to multiply a 2-digit number by a 1-digit number

Y3.86

I use efficient written methods to divide a 2-digit number by a 1-digit number

Y3.87

I solve problems using multiplication and division

 

Fractions

Y3.88

I count up and down in tenths

Y3.89

I know that tenths arise from dividing an object into 10 equal parts

Y3.90

I find and write fractions for a set of objects

Y3.91

I show equivalent fractions, using diagrams

Y3.92

I + and – fractions with the same denominator within a whole

 

 

 

Measures

Y3.93

I accurately measure, compare, add and subtract lengths (m, cm and mm)

Y3.94

I accurately measure, compare, add and subtract mass (kg and g)

Y3.95

I accurately measure, compare, add and subtract volume (l and ml)

Y3.96

I measure the perimeter of 2D shapes

Y3.97

I + and – amounts f money to give change using £ and p

Y3.98

I tell and write the time from an analogue clock and 24 hour clock

Y3.99

I write Roman numerals from I to XII

Y3.100

I know the number of seconds in a minute and the days in each month, year and leap year

Y3.101

I compare events by duration

 

 

Geometry

Y3.102

I draw 2D shapes

Y3.103

I make 3D shapes using modelling materials

Y3.104

I describe 3D shapes in different orientations

Y3.105

I know an angle as a property of shapes

Y3.106

I identify right angles

Y3.107

I know that two right angles make a half turn, three make a ¾ turn and 4 make a complete turn

Y3.108

I know whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle

Y3.109

I identify horizontal, vertical, perpendicular and parallel lines

Data

Y3.110

I interpret and present data using bar charts

Y3.111

I interpret and present data using tables

Y3.112

I use scales in pictograms and bar charts

 

Number Place Value and Rounding

Y4.113

I count in multiples of 6, 7, 9, 25 and 1000

Y4.114

I count backwards through zero to include negative numbers

Y4.115

I know the value of each digit in a 4-digit number

Y4.116

I order and compare numbers beyond 1000

Y4.117

I round any number to the nearest 10, 100 or 1000

Y4.118

I read Roman numerals to 100 (C)

 

Addition and Subtraction

Y4.119

I add numbers with up to 4 digits using efficient written methods

Y4.120

I subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using efficient written methods

Y4.121

I estimate to check answers to calculations

Y4.122

I solve two-step addition problems

Y4.123

I solve two-step subtraction problems

 

Multiplication and Division

Y4.124

I instantly recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables to 12 x 12

Y4.125

I multiply mentally

Y4.126

I use place value and known and derived facts to divide mentally

Y4.127

I multiply a 3-digit number by a 1-digit number

Y4.128

I solve problems involving multiplying and dividing

 

 

Fractions

Y4.129

I find equivalent fractions

Y4.130

I add and subtract fractions with the same denominator

Y4.131

I write decimal equivalents of any number featuring 10ths or 100ths

Y4.132

I write decimal equivalents of ¼, ½ and ¾

Y4.133

I multiply and divide a number by 10 and 100

Y4.134

I round decimals with 1 decimal place to the nearest whole number

Y4.135

I can solve measure and money problems involving fractions and decimals

 

 

 

Measures

Y4.136

I convert between different units of measurement

Y4.137

I measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure in centimetres and metres

Y4.138

I find the area of rectilinear shapes by counting

Y4.139

I estimate and calculate different measures, including money in pounds and pence

Y4.140

I read, write and convert time using analogue and digital 12-hour and 24-hour clocks

 

 

Geometry

Y4.141

I classify geometric shapes, including quadrilaterals and triangles, based on their properties and sizes

Y4.142

I know acute, obtuse and reflex angles

Y4.143

I compare and order angles up to two right angles by size

Y4.144

I complete a symmetrical figure with respect to a specific line of symmetry

Y4.145

I describe position on a 2D grid as co-ordinates in the first quadrant

Y4.146

I translate shapes

Y4.147

I plot specified points and draw sides to complete a given polygon

 

Data

Y4.148

I interpret and present data using line graphs

Y4.149

I solve comparison problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and line graphs

Y4.150

I solve sum problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and line graphs

Y4.151

I solve difference problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and line graphs

 

 

Number Place Value and Rounding

Y5.152

I read, write, order and compare numbers to 1,000,000

Y5.153

I know what each digit represents in numbers to 1,000,000

Y5.154

I count forwards and backwards in steps of 10 for any given number to 1,000,000

Y5.155

I use negative numbers

Y5.156

I round any number to 1,000,000 to the nearest 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 or 100,00

Y5.157

I solve number problems

Y5.158

I know years written in Roman numerals

Y5.159

I read Roman numerals to 1000 (M)

 

 

Addition and Subtraction

 

 

Y5.160

I add numbers with more than 4 digits (including decimals) using efficient written methods

Y5.161

I subtract numbers with up to 4 digits (including decimals) using efficient written methods

Y5.162

I add mentally using large numbers

Y5.163

I subtract mentally using large numbers

Y5.164

I use rounding to check answers to calculations

Y5.165

I solve multi-step addition problems

Y5.166

I solve multi-step subtraction problems

 

 

Multiplication and Division

Y5.167

I identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs

Y5.168

I know prime numbers, prime factors and composite numbers

Y5.169

I recall all prime numbers to 19

Y5.170

I multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a 2-digit number using an efficient written method

Y5.171

I divide numbers up to 4 digits by a 1-digit number using an efficient written method

Y5.172

I multiply and divide whole numbers and decimals by 10, 100and 1000

Y5.173

I identify square numbers and cube numbers

 

 

Fractions

Y5.174

I order fractions whose denominators are all multiples of the same number

Y5.175

I know mixed numbers and improper fractions and can convert them from one to another

Y5.176

I multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers

Y5.177

I read and write decimal numbers as fractions

Y5.178

I round numbers with 2 decimal places to the nearest whole number and to one decimal place

Y5.179

I read, write and order numbers with up to 3 decimal places

Y5.180

I know the % symbol and understand what it means

 

 

 

Measures

 

 

 

Y5.181

I convert units of measurement (km to m; m and cm; cm and mm; kg to g; l to ml)

Y5.182

I use basic equivalences to compare metric and common imperial units

Y5.183

I measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in cm and m

Y5.184

I calculate the area of squares and rectangles

Y5.185

I accurately estimate the area of irregular shapes

Y5.186

I accurately estimate volume and capacity

Y5.187

I convert between units in time

Y5.188

I solve problems involving addition and subtraction of units of measurement using decimal notation

 

 

 

Geometry

Y5.189

I identify 3D shapes, including cubes and cuboids, from 2D nets

Y5.190

I know angles are measured in degrees and can estimate and measure them accurately

Y5.191

I draw a given angle, writing its size in degrees

Y5.192

I identify multiples of 90 degrees

Y5.193

I identify angles at a point on a straight line

Y5.194

I draw shapes with given dimensions and angles

Y5.195

I use the properties of a rectangle and deduce related facts

Y5.196

I describe positions on the full coordinate grid (four quadrants)

Y5.197

I draw and translate shapes and reflect them in the axis

Data

Y5.198

I complete information in tables, including timetables

Y5.199

I read and interpret information in tables, including timetables

 

Number Place Value and Rounding

Y6.200

I read, write, order and compare numbers to 10,000,000

Y6.201

I round any whole number

Y6.202

I calculate intervals across 0 when using negative numbers

Y6.203

I solve number problems

Y6.204

I express missing number problems algebraically

Y6.205

I use simple formulae expressed in words

Y6.206

I generate and accurately describe linear number sequences

 

Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication and Division

 

Y6.207

I multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a decimal number

Y6.208

I divide multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a decimal number

Y6.209

I interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding

Y6.210

I calculate mentally, including with mixed operations and large numbers

Y6.211

I know common factors, common multiples and prime numbers

Y6.212

I use knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the four operations

Y6.213

I solve problems involving any operation

 

Fractions, Ratio and Proportion

Y6.214

I use common factors to simplify fractions

Y6.215

I associate a fraction with division to calculate decimal fraction equivalents for a fraction

Y6.216

I add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers

Y6.217

I multiply pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form

Y6.218

I divide proper fractions by whole numbers

Y6.219

I solve ratio and proportion problems

Fractions, decimals and Percentages

Y6.220

I identify the value of each digit to three decimal places

Y6.221

I use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to 2 decimal places

Y6.222

I solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy

Y6.223

I solve problems involving the calculation of percentages of whole numbers or measures

Y6.224

I convert fractions, decimals and percentages

 

 

Measures

Y6.225

I solve problems involving the conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation to 3 decimal places

Y6.226

I convert between miles and kilometres

Y6.227

I calculate the area of parallelograms

Y6.228

I calculate the area of triangles

Y6.229

I use the formulae for area and volume of shapes

Y6.230

I calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units

 

Geometry

Y6.231

I build simple 3 D shapes, including making nets

Y6.232

I compare and classify geometric shapes based on their properties and sizes

Y6.233

I find angles in any triangles, quadrilaterals and regular polygons

Y6.234

I know parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference

Y6.235

I find unknown angles

 

 

Data

Y6.236

I interpret pie charts

Y6.237

I construct pie charts

Y6.238

I interpret line graphs

Y6.239

I construct line graphs

Y6.240

I calculate and interpret the mean as an average

Y6.241

I interpret graphs relating two variables

 

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN SCIENCE

 

These are the Milestones for Science. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil).

 

Y1.1

I know some wild and garden plants

Y1.2

I know the difference between deciduous and evergreen trees

Y1.3

I know parts of plants and trees

Y1.4

I know some fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles and mammals

Y1.5

I know the difference between carnivores, herbivores and omnivores

Y1.6

I know parts of the bodies of fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles and mammals

Y1.7

I know parts of the human body

Y1.8

I know what the senses are

Y1.9

I know wood, plastic, glass, metal, water and rock

Y1.10

I can say what materials are like

Y1.11

I sort materials

Y1.12

I can say what the four seasons are like

Y2.13

I observe closely

Y2.14

I carry out a test

Y2.15

I use observations to suggest answers to questions

Y2.16

I gather and record information about what I have observed

Y2.17

I use scientific language

Y2.18

I know what is different about things that are living, dead or have never been alive

Y2.19

I understand how living things are suited to their habitats

Y2.20

I identify some plants and animals in their habitats and microhabitats

Y2.21

I explain how a food chain works

Y2.22

I explain how seeds and bulbs grow

Y2.23

I know that plants need water, light and suitable temperature to grow

Y2.24

I know that adult animals have young animals

Y2.25

I know that animals and humans need air, food and water for survival

Y2.26

I know that to be healthy humans need to exercise, keep clean and eat the right kinds and amounts of food

Y2.27

I explain what some materials are suitable for

Y2.28

I know that the shape of some solid objects can be changed

Y3.29

I carry out a scientific enquiry and test it fairly

Y3.30

I use a thermometer accurately

Y3.31

I know what parts of flowering plants are for

Y3.32

I explain what flowers do in the life cycle of flowering plants

Y3.33

I know that plants need nutrients and room to grow

Y3.34

I know how water moves in plants

Y3.35

I know that animals and humans need the right kinds and amounts of nutrients

Y3.36

I know that some animals and all humans have a skeleton and muscles for support, protection and movement

Y3.37

I classify rocks by appearance and physical properties

Y3.38

I know how fossils are formed

Y3.39

I know that soil is made from rock and organic matter

Y3.40

I know that we need light to see and that dark is the absence of light

Y3.41

I know that light is reflected from surfaces

Y3.42

I explain why light from the sun can be dangerous

Y3.43

I know that shadows are formed when light is blocked by a solid object

Y3.44

I know that pushes and pulls move objects and that surfaces change movement

Y3.45

I know that most forces need contact between two objects but that magnetic force acts at a distance

Y3.46

I know that magnets have two poles and that these attract or repel

Y3.47

I explain which objects are attracted and repelled by magnets

Y4.48

I record findings and observations suitably and accurately

Y4.49

I present results and conclusions orally and in writing

Y4.50

I use the results of scientific enquiry to make sensible predictions

Y4.51

I group living things in different ways

Y4.52

I explain that environments can change and that changes affect living things

Y4.53

I know what parts of the human digestive system do

Y4.54

I know what different types of teeth do

Y4.55

I explain food chains using particular words

Y4.56

I know whether materials are solids, liquids or gases

Y4.57

I know that materials change when they are heated or cooled

Y4.58

I explain the parts played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle

Y4.59

I know that sound is made when objects vibrate and the ear receives vibrations

Y4.60

I explain how sound pitch is related to the features of the object that produced it

Y4.61

I explain the connections between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it

Y4.62

I explain the link between the volume of a sound and the distance from its source

Y4.63

I know how to make an electrical circuit and can name its parts

Y4.64

I can correctly predict whether a lamp in an electric circuit will work

Y4.65

I identify good conductors and good insulators

Y5.66

I plan an investigation which controls variables

Y5.67

I measure with precision using scientific instruments

Y5.68

I use data to raise a question and then plan a fair test to answer it

Y5.69

I explain the life cycle of different species of animals

Y5.70

I know how some plants and animals reproduce

Y5.71

I know how humans develop to old age

Y5.72

I classify materials by hardness, solubility, transparency and conductivity

Y5.73

I know that some materials dissolve and some do not

Y5.74

I know how to recover a substance from a solution by evaporation

Y5.75

I separate solids by filtering

Y5.76

I explain how evaporation occurs

Y5.77

I explain the uses of particular materials

Y5.78

I know that some changes in materials are reversible and some are irreversible

Y5.79

I know that some changes in materials make new materials

Y5.80

I explain the movement of the Earth relative to the Sun

Y5.81

I explain the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth

Y5.82

I explain day and night by saying about the earth’s rotation

Y5.83

I explain gravity

Y5.84

I explain the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction

Y5.85

I know how some mechanisms help a smaller force to have a greater effect

Y6.86

I can say whether evidence is scientific or not

Y6.87

I explain how living things are classified

Y6.88

I know about the main parts of the circulatory system

Y6.89

I explain how diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle impact on the human body

Y6.90

I know how nutrients and water are transported in animals and humans

Y6.91

I explain how plant and animal adaptation can lead to evolutionary changes over long periods

Y6.92

I know that light appears to travel in straight lines

Y6.93

I know that we see things because light travels from light sources to objects and then to our eyes

Y6.94

I know that shadows have the same shape as objects that cast them because light travels in straight lines

Y6.95

I know what happens when voltage is increased or decreased

Y6.96

I can produce a circuit diagram using recognised symbols for components

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

These are the Milestones for Physical Education. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil).

 

Y1.1

I travel at different speeds

Y1.2

I find space and use it safely

Y1.3

I hop on one leg

Y1.4

I jump and land with my two feet together

Y1.5

I hold a balance on one leg

Y1.6

I skip

Y1.7

I choose movements that suit ideas and feelings

Y1.8

I catch a ball

Y1.9

I am confident in shallow water

Y1.10

I change for PE and change back in a quick and orderly way

Y2.11

I hold a balance on two parts of my body but just using one foot

Y2.12

I climb confidently on large apparatus

Y2.13

I take a full part in small team games

Y2.14

I throw a ball near to where I want it to go

Y2.15

I work well in a team, helping it to play together

Y2.16

I swim 10 metres using a recognised stroke

Y2.17

I make up and perform movement patterns to create a dance

Y2.18

I pass a ball while moving

Y2.19

I swim on my back

Y2.20

I confidently swim 25 metres using a recognised stroke

Y2.21

I perform a safe self-rescue in water

Y2.22

I change for PE and change back in a quick and orderly way – within 5 minutes

Y3.23

I do a proper forward roll

Y3.24

I jump off a balance beam or vaulting horse and land correctly

Y3.25

I plan and carry out an effective warm-up

Y3.26

I run fast: 75m in 18.5 seconds

Y3.27

I pass a ball accurately using a kick or throw

Y3.28

I do a standing jump

Y3.29

I create and perform a dance, varying the speed of movement

Y3.30

I reach out to catch a ball

Y4.31

I walk the full length of a balance beam

Y4.32

I do a proper backward roll

Y4.33

I do a chest pass and a bounce pass successfully

Y4.34

I vault over a vaulting horse or nesting table

Y4.35

I create and perform a dance, with complex phases

Y4.36

I throw a ball accurately

Y4.37

I use advice / coaching to improve my performance

Y4.38

I catch a ball that has been struck or thrown from a long distance

Y4.39

I attack and defend effectively

Y4.40

I do a chest pass and a bounce pass successfully when I am moving

Y4.41

I change for PE and change back in a quick and orderly way – within 4 minutes

Y5.42

I do a supported handstand

Y5.43

I improve my ‘personal best’ in at least two athletics activities

Y5.44

I run with an efficient style suitable for distance running

Y5.45

I throw and catch different balls, including a rugby ball, at speed

Y5.46

I do a standing jump

Y5.47

I throw a vortex over a particular distance

Y5.48

I create and perform a dance, with complex phases

Y5.49

I show a competitive spirit when playing in team games

Y6.50

I perform a technically correct breaststroke

Y6.51

I perform a technically correct back stroke

Y6.52

I perform a technically correct front crawl

Y6.53

I understand and confidently play a range of team games

Y6.54

I change for PE and change back in a quick and orderly way – within 3 minutes

Y6.55

I perform a safe self-rescue in different water conditions

Y6.56

I confidently swim 25 metres sustaining one of the above strokes

Y6.57

I create and perform a dance, with complex phases

Y6.58

I sprint, including a proper sprint start and dip finish

Y6.59

I coordinate a triple jump

Y6.60

I do a standing jump

Y6.61

I throw a vortex over a particular distance

Y6.62

I improve my ‘personal best’ in three athletics activities; 1 track and 2 field

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN MUSIC

 

These are the Milestones for Music. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil).

 

Y1.1

I sing some songs from memory

Y1.2

I sing tunefully

Y1.3

I clap a rhythm accurately

Y1.4

I accompany singing, using an untuned instrument to hold the beat

Y2.5

I play the recorder

Y2.6

I read treble clef staff notation accurately

Y3.7

I control my voice when I sing to reflect the context

Y4.8

I sing alone

Y4.9

I sing a range of songs from memory

Y5.10

I recognise and describe features of music drawn from different traditions, composers and musicians

Y5.11

I demonstrate an increasing aural memory

Y5.12

I explain developments in the history of music

Y6.13

I identify and articulate the features of a range of musical styles

Y6.14

I sing songs in rounds, contributing with accuracy, fluency, control and expression to the dynamics of the performance

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN GEOGRAPHY

 

These are the Milestones for Geography. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil).

 

Y1.1

I know how one place can be different from another

Y1.2

I draw a simple sketch map with things in the right place

Y1.3

I name the four countries of the United Kingdom and show where they are on a map of the UK

Y1.4

I find Britain on a map of the world

Y1.5

I say what the weather is like in different seasons

Y1.6

I describe what these are like: beach, forest, hill, mountain, sea and river

Y1.7

I say what these are like: house, village, town, farm, road and shop

Y1.8

I show north, south, east and west on a map

Y2.9

I draw a sketch map with things in the right place and in the right proportions

Y2.10

I name the capital cities of the four countries of the United Kingdom and show where they are on a map of the UK

Y2.11

I name the seven continents and the five oceans and show where they are on a world map and a globe

Y2.12

I know how places are similar and different and suggest reasons why

Y2.13

I know some things about Ipswich

Y2.14

I know some things about a contrasting European country

Y2.15

I find Ipswich and Suffolk on a map of Britain

Y2.16

I say what the main features are on an atlas map and a globe

Y2.17

I show where the hot and cold parts of the world are, using the terms the poles and the equator

Y2.18

I describe what these are like: coast, cliff, ocean, valley and vegetation

Y2.19

I say what these are like: city, factory, office, port and harbour

Y2.20

I show where these are on a world map: France, Italy, Spain, Russia, China, India, Japan, Canada, USA, Brazil and Mexico

Y2.21

I know a lot about the geography of my school

Y2.22

I use fieldwork techniques to find out about my local area

Y3.23

I show where particular countries are on a map of Europe

Y3.24

I name major geographical features and show where they are on a world map and a globe

Y3.25

I name important places and show where they are on a map of the United Kingdom

Y3.26

I say what the main features of important places are

Y3.27

I explain how one place has changed over time

Y3.28

I name some counties and show where they are on a map of England

Y3.29

I describe and explain land use patterns in north-west Ipswich

Y3.30

I know about the equator

Y4.31

I draw a detailed sketch map, using symbols for geographical features

Y4.32

I explain the order of places

Y4.33

I know about the northern and southern hemispheres

Y4.34

I know about the Arctic and Antarctic circles

Y4.35

I know a lot about the human geography of East Anglia

Y4.36

I know a lot about the physical geography of East Anglia

Y4.37

I know about mountains

Y4.38

I know about volcanoes

Y4.39

I know about where food comes from

Y4.40

I explain the symbols on an Ordnance Survey map

Y4.41

I use fieldwork techniques to find out about my local area

Y5.42

I know what lines of latitude and longitude are

Y5.43

I know about the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn

Y5.44

I know a lot about the human geography of a region of a European country

Y5.45

I know a lot about the physical geography of a region of a European country

Y5.46

I know about rivers and the water cycle

Y5.47

I know about earthquakes

Y5.48

I know about settlement hierarchy

Y5.49

I know about some important economic and trade links

Y5.50

I explain land use on an Ordnance Survey map

Y5.51

I explain the 8 points of the compass in relation to a given map

Y5.52

I use 4-figure grid references to locate features on a map

Y5.53

I follow directions on a road map

Y6.54

I draw a detailed and accurate map

Y6.55

I know a lot about the human geography of Chile

Y6.56

I know a lot about the physical geography of Chile

Y6.57

I know about the Prime/Greenwich meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Y6.58

I know about climate zones

Y6.59

I know about biomes and vegetation belts

Y6.60

I know about where energy comes from

Y6.61

I know where minerals come from

Y6.62

I use 6-figure grid references to locate features on a map

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN HISTORY

 

These are the Milestones for History. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil).

 

Y1.1

I know some of the ways that life has changed

Y1.2

I know about some of the things that happened long ago

Y2.3

I know about some people in the past

Y2.4

I know about some of the things that have happened where I live

Y2.5

I know about some people in the past who lived where I live

Y2.6

I understand some of the ways to find out about the past

Y3.7

I know some things about Roman Britain

Y3.8

I know a lot about Ancient Greece

Y4.9

I know about the Anglo-Saxons and Scots

Y4.10

I know about the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings

Y4.11

I place some famous people, some things that have happened and some changes that have taken place in time order

Y4.12

I know a lot about an event in history where I live

Y4.13

I know a lot about Ancient Egypt

Y5.14

I know some things about Stone Age and Iron Age life

Y5.15

I explain many of the ways in which we can find out about the past

Y5.16

I understand that you can look at the past in different ways and come to different views about what happened

Y5.17

I know a lot about an important aspect of British history

Y5.18

I place periods of history in time order

Y6.19

I know a lot about an important aspect of British history

Y6.20

I give the reasons for – and explain the results of – an important historical event

Y6.21

I know a lot about the Mayan civilisation

Y6.22

I place periods of history in time order

 

WHAT PUPILS SHOULD KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND BE ABLE TO DO IN COMPUTING

 

These are the Computing for Physical Education. They are arranged by year group expectation (for the middle attaining pupil).

 

Y1.1

I understand that some everyday devices are programmed

Y1.2

I give and follow precise instructions to steer a programmable toy

Y1.3

I identify the algorithm needed to achieve a specific purpose

Y1.4

I test instructions and successfully ebug

Y1.5

I can say what I have learned about algorithms and predict outcomes

Y1.6

I use technology to create, store and retrieve digital content

Y1.7

I use technology safely

Y2.8

I explain what algorithms are and give examples

Y2.9

I sequence instructions correctly

Y2.10

I create an algorithm to solve a specific problem

Y2.11

I use technology safely and respectfully and I know where to go for help if I have concerns about digital content

Y3.12

I know what coding is and what it is for

Y3.13

I apply coding and computational thinking to a specific activity

Y3.14

I work effectively with different forms of input and output

Y3.15

I use search technologies confidently

Y3.16

I present information clearly using ICT

Y4.17

I find and correct errors in algorithms and programs

Y4.18

I design programs to achieve specific tasks

Y4.19

I select systems to achieve specific solutions

Y4.20

I select, use and combine internet systems confidently

Y4.21

I analyse and evaluate information using ICT

Y4.22

I know several ways of reporting concerns about digital content

Y5.23

I know that computer networks can provide multiple services

Y5.24

I select, use and combine different software to achieve specific goals

Y5.25

I collect and present data effectively

Y5.26

I recognise acceptable and unacceptable behaviour online

Y5.27

I explain how computer networks help communication and collaboration

Y6.28

I find and correct errors in algorithms and programs

Y6.29

I explain how search results are ranked

Y6.30

I design and create systems effectively

Y6.31

I explain in detail how to keep safe online

 

 

Phonics and reading schemes used at Key Stage 1

 

[Please see ENGLISH under the TEACHING AND LEARNING tab.]

How parents can find out more about the school’s curriculum

 

St. Pancras parents and carers are personally provided with the full breakdown of the Milestones, the curricular / learning expectations for every year group in every subject. The school has developed what it refers to as a Milestones approach to optimising the effectiveness of teaching, learning and assessment. There is a list of the Milestones on this website (see above).

 

Additionally, parents receive class-specific information about topics and programmes of study (see Class Pages under Helping Parents). Teachers also hold meetings for parents to promote an effective home-school understanding of the content of the curriculum and the learning expectations of our children.

 

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