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PLEASE CONTACT US:

Mr. Stephen Barker, Headteacher, St. Pancras Catholic Primary School, Stratford Road, Ipswich. IP1 6EF.

Telephone: 01473 742074. Email: ad.st.pancras.p@talk21.com.

The School Office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday.

 

PLEASE NOTE: Any parent who would like to have information on this website in hard copy is entitled to receive it free of charge. Please make any request to the School Office.

Our equality objectives

We have two Specific Duties under the 2010 Equality Act:

• To publish information to demonstrate our compliance with the general duty to promote equality

• To prepare and publish one or more equality objectives

As a matter of good practice, objectives should have five attributes. They should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-limited.

 

Ethos:

St. Pancras Catholic Primary School stands against all forms of discrimination on the grounds of ethnic origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender, disability or ability. The school’s equality objectives should be read in conjunction with its Accessibility Policy, its Equal Opportunities Policy and its Disability Equality Scheme. Together with the school’s Equality Policy, these are all  available in hard copy from the School Office.

 

Use of data:

The school maintains data on the composition of its pupil roll broken down by year group, ethnicity, gender, impairment and proficiency in English and Mathematics. Some of this information is not publicly available as it is not good practice to publish information might allow individuals to be identified. St. Pancras is committed to collating data on inequalities of outcome and participation to inform the process of setting objectives for improvement.

 

Before introducing new policies or measures that may have an impact on equality, the school will carefully assess their potential, positive or negative, and keeps a record of the analysis and judgements which it makes. The headteacher has special responsibility for equalities. If you wish to discuss equality matters please contact the headteacher through the School Office. A member of the governing body has a watching brief for equalities matters. For Academic Year 2016-17 this governor is yet to be appointed. In the meantime, Assistant Headteacher, Mr. Ian Clarke, champions the equalities cause. The school’s programme of staff meetings and continuing professional development (CPD) includes reference to equalities matters, both directly and incidentally.

 

There are clear procedures for dealing with equality issues, those observed by staff, governors or other professionals and those reported by parents / carers. For our policy for responding to prejudice-related bullying / incidents please see below.

Surveys show that most pupils feel safe from all kinds of bullying. Evidence of this comes from our most recent Ofsted report and from consultations with both pupils and parents.

 

Focused attention is paid to the needs of specific groups of pupils (for example, those who are most at risk). There is coverage in the curriculum of equalities issues, particularly with respect to tackling prejudice and promoting community cohesion and mutual understanding. There are activities across the curriculum that promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.

Our equality objectives:

 

To reduce the incidence of the use of homophobic language by pupils in school.

School data indicates that this is largely a ‘boy’ issue – from Year 2 to Year 6

 

To narrow the gap between pupils eligible for Pupil Premium funding and other pupils in terms of attainment and progress in reading, writing and mathematics.

Performance data indicates that pupils eligible for Pupil Premium support – Looked After Children, those entitled to Free school Meals and Service Children – do not make as much progress and attain the same standards as other pupils in the school

 

To narrow the gap between girls and boys in terms of their respective perceptions of and expectations in mathematics

In-house pupil perception data indicates that girls do not enjoy mathematics as much as boys – and do not expect to do as well in the subject

 

These objectives are all given a high profile in the school’s Priority Action Plan which details precisely how the school intends to achieve its objectives and the criteria it will use to measure the extent of its success.

Accessibility Plan 2016-17

 

The Equality Act 2010 replaced most previous Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) legislation and brought together a range of equality duties and requirements under one heading. The Equality Act introduced a single Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED), sometimes referred to as the general duty, that applies to public bodies, including maintained schools, academies and Free Schools and which extends to all protected characteristics - race, disability, sex, age, religion or belief, sexual orientation, pregnancy and maternity and gender reassignment. This combined Equality Duty came into effect in April 2011.

 

In carrying out their functions public bodies are required to have due regard to the need to the three main elements:

 

  • The elimination of discrimination and other conduct that is prohibited by the Act
  • Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and people who do not share it
  • The fostering of good relations across all characteristics - between people who share a protected characteristic and people who do not share it

 

The three key duties under the Equality Act in relation to education provision are:

 

  • Not to treat disabled pupils less favourably for a reason related to their disability
  • To make reasonable adjustments for disabled pupils so that they are not at a substantial disadvantage
  • To publish and implement accessibility strategy to increase access to school education for disabled pupils

 

Definition of disability:

Under the Equality Act 2010 a people are disabled if they have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long term adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day to day activities. The definition can include a wide range of physical or mental impairments including learning difficulties; sensory impairments such as those affecting sight or hearing; mental health conditions; medical conditions; and hidden impairments such as autism and speech, language and communication impairments, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and people diagnosed with cancer, HIV infection or multiple sclerosis.

 

The test of whether an impairment affects normal day-to-day activity is whether it affects one or more of the following:

    • mobility
    • manual dexterity
    • physical co-ordination
    • continence
    • ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects
    • speech, hearing or eyesight
    • memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand
    • perception of risk of physical danger

 

The ability to memorise, concentrate, learn, speak, move, make and maintain positive relationships is central to a child’s education. An impairment that has a long-term and substantial effect on a child’s ability to do these things may amount to a disability.

 

Some disabled children also have special educational needs (SEN) and may be receiving support via school-based SEN provision or have a Statement of SEN or an Education Health and Care Plan (EHC Plan). However, some disabled children will not have SEN, and some disabled children with SEN will still need reasonable adjustments to be made for them in addition to any support they receive through the SEN framework.

 

An accessibility strategy is a plan for, over a prescribed period:

(a) increasing the extent to which disabled pupils can participate in the

schools’ curriculum

(b) improving the physical environment of the schools for the purpose of

increasing the extent to which disabled pupils are able to take advantage

of education, facilities and services provided by or offered by the

school

(c) improving the delivery to disabled pupils of information which is readily

accessible to pupils who are not disabled. The delivery of information in (c) must be:

  • within a reasonable time
  • in ways which are determined after taking account of the pupils’ disabilities and any preferences expressed by them or their parents.

 

Schools are required to plan for:

increasing access for disabled pupils to the school curriculum. This covers teaching and learning and the wider curriculum of the school such as

  • participation in after-school clubs, leisure and cultural activities or school visits
  • improving access to the physical environment of schools. This covers improvements to the physical environment of the school and physical aids to access education
  • improving the delivery of written information to disabled children and young people. This will include planning to make written information that is normally provided by the school to all children also available to disabled children. Examples might include hand outs, timetables, textbooks and information about school events. The information should take account of individual disabilities and preferred formats and be made available within a reasonable time frame

 

The DfE’s guidance for schools makes it clear that schools have a duty to produce an accessibility plan, have regard to the need to provide adequate resources for implementing their plan and, during the period to which the plan relates, the responsible body must keep its accessibility plan under review and, if necessary, revise it. It is the duty of the responsible body to implement its accessibility plan.

 

From September 2012 the reasonable adjustments duty for Local Authorities and schools included a duty to provide auxiliary aids and services for disabled children subject to the Reasonable Adjustment duty. The Equality Act does not set out what would be a reasonable adjustment or a list of factors to consider in determining what is reasonable.

 

In the Equality Duty 2011, the duty to make reasonable adjustments applies only to disabled people. For schools, this duty is summarised as follows and this accessibility strategy recognises and promotes these principles:

 

Where something a school does places a disabled pupil at a disadvantage compared to other pupils then the school must take reasonable steps to try and avoid that disadvantage.

Schools are not subject to the other reasonable adjustment duty to make alterations to physical features because this is already considered as part of their planning duties.

 

The reasonable adjustments duty is triggered only where there is a need to avoid ‘substantial disadvantage’. Whether or not a disabled child or young person is at a substantial disadvantage or not will depend on the individual situation.

 

In addition to having a duty to consider reasonable adjustments for particular individual disabled children and young people, schools will also have to consider potential adjustments which may be needed for disabled children and young people generally as it is likely that any school will admit a disabled child at some point.

 

Schools have this anticipatory duty and should not, therefore, wait until a disabled child or young person arrives before making or planning to make reasonable adjustments. This may be too late and could lead to an individual being substantially disadvantaged.

 

Schools are not obliged to anticipate and make adjustments for every imaginable disability but it is important for schools to plan a broad range of accessibility improvements over time. Many reasonable adjustments are inexpensive and will often involve a change in practice rather than the provision of expensive pieces of equipment or additional staff. Schools should, for example, be prepared to produce large font papers for children and young people with a visual impairment in advance of admission. Many other reasonable adjustments that schools are already making for disabled children and young people include the use of some auxiliary aids, such as coloured layovers for dyslexic pupils, pen grips, adapted PE equipment, adapted keyboards and computer software.

 

It will be for schools to consider the reasonableness of adjustments based on the circumstances of each case. However, factors a school may consider when assessing the reasonableness of an adjustment relevant to its own context may include the financial or other resources required for the adjustment, its effectiveness, its effect on other children and young people, health and safety requirements and whether aids should be made available from other agencies.

 

What would be a reasonable adjustment is often a matter of judgement and, wherever possible, should be decided by agreement between the Local Authority, the school and parents/carers e.g. the right of a child/ young person to attend a school of their choice needs to be balanced with the responsibility of the Council to make the most efficient use of its resources.

 

Children with autism can often have difficulty interpreting their surroundings and communicating and interacting with others. They need access to calm, distraction free learning environment, which is predictable and easily understood, as the reduction in sensory stimulus helps to reduce anxiety and distress.

 

Environmental adaptations may include provision of an accessible, alternative teaching and learning space within the school to which children and young people can be withdrawn, or can withdraw themselves, should the classroom environment become overwhelming or present sensory challenges. Support services from health and education can also advise on adaptations to the inside and outside environment for individuals to help include children and young people with sensory needs.

 

Children and young people who are experiencing social emotional or/and mental health needs  may need extra space to ensure a safe, comfortable distance between themselves and peers. They may need a more secluded place to settle and stabilise their emotions.

 

Specialist health services can also support and advise schools on a range of strategies that enhance the inclusion of disabled children and young people. For example:

 

  • Occupational Therapists can advise a school about using activity based therapies to help raise an individual’s self-esteem and encourage them to be as independent as possible. They can also advise on any appropriate specialist equipment or adaptations to the school environment if required

 

  • Physiotherapists can advise a school about an individual’s mobility and physical development. This might include things like co-ordination and ability to sit, stand and walk. They can advise a school on how best to help the child physically to keep the child as mobile as possible and on any appropriate specialist equipment or adaptations to the environment

 

Some children and young people with a hearing impairment may also benefit from British Sign Language (BSL) signage being displayed visually around school.

 

Visual impairment

Written material should be produced in a minimum of 12 point and printed in a plain font. However, for some visually impaired children and young people, this may not be sufficient.  Large print format has a wide user group. It uses large print with illustrations and can be supported by audio. The language is reduced in complexity and jargon.

 

Braille facilities, signage and talking/text reading facilities should be considered.

 

Hearing impairment

Schools should consider the provision of specialist access equipment for children and young people with severe communication difficulties and members of the deaf community. This may include:

  • specialist assistive listening devices such as radio aids and Sound Field Systems, text phones, and video telephone systems
  • certain information in video format requiring both subtitles and British Sign Language (BSL) sign interpreting services as well as live voice
  • certain information access requiring the provision of BSL interpreting services across a number of levels for a range of information contact points

 

The St. Pancras Plan

 

Increasing the extent to which disabled pupils can participate in the schools’ curriculum

 

Current equality of opportunity

 

DISABILITY-TYPE

CURRENT PUPIL / STAFF PROFILE

CURRENT PROVISION

Mobility

(No pupils or staff)

Ramps to all areas

No stairs / (all ground floor)

Spacious, uncluttered areas

Manual dexterity

(No pupils or staff)

Large flexi-grip pencils

Physical co-ordination

(No pupils or staff)

Gym Trail capability

Continence

One Y5 child

Personal Care Plan, featuring adult support (where needed), personal-use bio bidet, hygiene aids (e.g. baby wipes) and a dedicated waste bin for personal waste

Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

(No pupils or staff)

Manual handling training for the caretaker

Chair trolley

Speech, hearing or eyesight

Several pupils with early speech difficulties / some children with hearing loss

Two pupils with Irlen Syndrome

Weekly 1:1 and small group expert help from Communicate and Care

Fortnightly 1:1 from Suffolk NHS speech & language therapy service

Coloured exercise books and overlays

Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

Several pupils with short term memory and / or concentration issues / several children with learning difficulties

Regularly reviewed School Support Plans detailing 1:1 / small group provision

Perception of risk of physical danger

Four pupils on the autistic spectrum: 

1:1 supervision in class and at transition times

 

Advance equality of opportunity

 

DISABILITY-TYPE

PROPOSED ADJUSTMENTS

Mobility

No proposed adjustments

Manual dexterity

No proposed adjustments

Physical co-ordination

No proposed adjustments

Continence

No proposed adjustments

Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

No proposed adjustments

Speech, hearing or eyesight

Continued training of teaching assistants, through Communicate & Care, to improve the school’s capacity to help pupils to overcome speech barriers

A permanent hall-based soundfield system- with sub-systems in each of our classes

Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

No proposed adjustments as yet – but senior staff would like to initiate a programme to improve younger pupils’ capacity to concentrate

Perception of risk of physical danger

No proposed adjustments

 

 

Improving the physical environment of the schools for the purpose of increasing the extent to which disabled pupils are able to take advantage of education, facilities and services provided by or offered by the school

 

Current equality of opportunity

 

DISABILITY-TYPE

CURRENT PUPIL / STAFF PROFILE

CURRENT PROVISION

Mobility

One member of staff

Risk assessment

Car parking adjacent to the school building

Ramps to all areas

Disabled toilets x 2

No stairs / (all ground floor)

Spacious, uncluttered areas

Manual dexterity

(No pupils or staff)

Large flexi-grip pencils

Physical co-ordination

(No pupils or staff)

Gym Trail capability

Continence

One Y5 child

Personal Care Plan, featuring adult support (where needed), personal-use bio bidet, hygiene aids (e.g. baby wipes) and a dedicated waste bin for personal waste

Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

(No pupils or staff)

(No physical environment adjustments needed)

Speech, hearing or eyesight

Several pupils with early speech difficulties / some children with hearing loss

Two pupils with Irlen Syndrome

Coloured exercise books and overlays

Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

Several pupils with short term memory and / or concentration issues / several children with learning difficulties

(No physical environment adjustments needed)

Perception of risk of physical danger

Four pupils on the autistic spectrum

1:1 supervision in class and at transition times

 

Advance equality of opportunity

 

DISABILITY-TYPE

PROPOSED ADJUSTMENTS

Mobility

Disabled car parking space/s as close to the Stratford Road entrance to the school as possible

Manual dexterity

No proposed adjustments

Physical co-ordination

No proposed adjustments

Continence

No proposed adjustments

Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

Provision of easy-to-use dining tables and chairs for the particular benefit of kitchen and teaching assistant staff

Speech, hearing or eyesight

No proposed adjustments

Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

No proposed adjustments

Perception of risk of physical danger

No proposed adjustments

 

Improving the delivery to disabled pupils of information which is readily accessible to pupils who are not disabled

 

Current equality of opportunity

 

DISABILITY-TYPE

CURRENT PUPIL / STAFF PROFILE

CURRENT PROVISION

Mobility

One member of staff

Risk assessment

Signage

Ramps to all areas

Disabled toilets x 2

No stairs / (all ground floor)

Spacious, uncluttered areas

Manual dexterity

(No pupils or staff)

(No information delivery adjustments needed)

Physical co-ordination

(No pupils or staff)

(No information delivery adjustments needed)

Continence

One Y5 child

Personal Care Plan, featuring adult support (where needed), personal-use bio bidet, hygiene aids (e.g. baby wipes) and a dedicated waste bin for personal waste

Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

(No pupils or staff)

(No information delivery adjustments needed)

Speech, hearing or eyesight

Several pupils with early speech difficulties / some children with hearing loss

Two pupils with Irlen Syndrome

(No information delivery adjustments needed)

Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

Several pupils with short term memory and / or concentration issues / several children with learning difficulties

(No information delivery adjustments needed)

Perception of risk of physical danger

Four pupils on the autistic spectrum: 

(No information delivery adjustments needed)

 

Advance equality of opportunity

 

DISABILITY-TYPE

PROPOSED ADJUSTMENTS

Mobility

No proposed adjustments

Manual dexterity

No proposed adjustments

Physical co-ordination

No proposed adjustments

Continence

No proposed adjustments

Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

No proposed adjustments

Speech, hearing or eyesight

 

More – and improved – signage / display throughout the school to reinforce key learning

A permanent hall-based soundfield system- with sub-systems in each of our classes (see above)

Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

Perception of risk of physical danger

No proposed adjustments

 

 

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